Saturday, January 27, 2007

Coming Out as a Dyspraxic

Well to be fair some of you know this already, but it is something I have kept deliberatley quiet about for a long while, for what I considered to be good reasons. But recently I have come to the conclusion that it would be best if I was totally straightforward and open about something which I was born with, which I was suspected of having when I was about six years old and which I was formally diagnosed with in my early twenties, and which I have been secretive about out of fear of people's reactions.
Anyone who doesn't know what I am talking about can read about it here. I do stress though that I have a very mild form, so some of this does not apply, but it's just so you get the picture. What is sad is that there a lot of people out there with it, who have not been diagnosed and who are seen as simply clumsy, wierd, and stupid, leaving them with a sense of low self esteem.

7 comments:

Andrew said...

Hadn't heard of this before - good for you for being so open about it and helping raise awareness!

Lisa Rullsenberg said...

Dyspraxia, like dyslexia, is often misunderstood or not properly recognised. In much the same way that many people erroneously think dyslexia is "about getting your 'b' and 'd' letters mixed up and it means you can't read", so dyspraxia has been frequently dismissed as "just being clumsy". I'm a little reluctant to find a syndrome or 'diagnosis' for every difference between people (I'm a 'social model' person rather than 'medical model' or 'deficit model'), but that issue aside bringing dyspraxia to light is incredibly helpful.

Anonymous said...

wouldn't want to be on ur team for the paintballing then

Paul Burgin said...

Thanks Andrew. Lisa you are right not much is known about it and it does vary from person to person and more needs to be done to bring it to light. Anon, I can deliberatley misfire you know ;)

Citizen Andreas said...

You ain't alone on this one Paul, I was officially diagnosed with dyspraxia in my teens. Although the general clumsiness and poor coordination meant that I was always seen as "a bit wierd" when I was growing up.

I don't think it's anything to be ashamed of in the slightest.

Anonymous said...

is the mispelling of weird as wierd a symptom?

Citizen Andreas said...

No, it isn't.