Wednesday, April 25, 2007

Euston Manifesto Event

Received an e-mail yesterday evening, part of which I have copied:

Humanitarian Intervention post-Iraq, Monday 30th April.

Jubilee Room, Westminster Hall, Houses of Parliament, London.

A Euston Manifesto Forum

On Monday 30th April, a panel of leading Ministers, MPs, and thinkers will come together to discuss the future of humanitarian intervention, after the conflict in Iraq.

As a Euston Manifesto signatory blog, we would like to give your readership the opportunity to ask questions directly to the panel. We would really appreciate you and your readers' contributions to this important debate, and would be grateful to you if you could raise awareness of the event, which we hope will raise nationally and internationally the importance of humanitarian intervention.

The speakers include: -

Rt. Hon. Hilary Benn MP, Minister for International Development and a candidate for the Labour party deputy leadership.

Prof. Brian Brivati, Professor of Contemporary History and Human Rights at Kingston University.

Nick Cohen, journalist for the Observer and New Statesman, and author of 'What's Left? How Liberals lost their way'.

Gary Kent, Director of Labour Friends of Iraq.

Pat McFadden MP, Parliamentary Under-Secretary at the Cabinet Office

Karen Pollock, Chief Executive of the Holocaust Educational Trust (tbc.)

In a first of its kind, the forum will be broadcast on Youtube and, hopefully, simultaneously these clips will be placed on blogs sympathetic to the Euston Manifesto across the internet, globally.

Please ask your readership to submit questions to the panel


--------------------
Let me know your thoughts on this

1 comment:

Man in a shed said...

I'm two thirds of my way through Nick Cohen's book "What's Left" and what I can't understand is how anyone could be a member of a quasi cult like movement like British left wing politics that requires amnesia and hypocrisy to function as a member. If anything he's strengthened that view so far. Perhaps he explains himself in the last third. But I'm not holding my breath.